Minimally Invasive Surgery (MIS)

MIS Joint Replacement offers important advantages, requiring smaller incisions and potentially causing less trauma, shorter hospital stay, faster recovery and less scarring than traditional techniques.

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Total Joint Replacement (TJR)

Total joint replacement is a surgical procedure in which certain parts of an arthritic or damaged joint are removed and replaced with an artificial joint, which is designed to move just like a healthy joint.

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Shape Match Custom Fit Knee

A Triathlon Custom Fit Knee® (GetAroundKnee) with ShapeMatch® Technology replacement allows Dr. Kastrup to perform your knee procedure with customized guides that are designed to provide a fit more closely matching your unique anatomy.

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Pre-Operative Joint Replacement FAQ

  1. Are non-invasive treatment options attempted before more comprehensive correction?
  2. If utilized, what non-invasive treatment approaches may be prescribed?
  3. In the case of joint replacement surgery, what diagnostic exams and tests will be completed pre-surgery?
  4. What behavioral changes should be made before joint replacement surgery?
  5. What types of planning should be completed for post-op recovery success?


1. Are non-invasive treatment options attempted before more comprehensive correction?

The specific course of treatment pursued will depend on a number of factors, including, but not limited to: condition severity, speed of damage degeneration, and patient medical history. In some cases, non-invasive treatments may be utilized either during the diagnostic phase, or in an effort to alleviate symptoms and delay surgery.

While some patients report significant relief from these approaches, in cases of more advanced damage, immediate surgery may be prescribed. Each patient situation is assessed on a case-by-case basis, allowing for the most personalized treatment plan possible.

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2. If utilized, what non-invasive treatment approaches may be prescribed?

Common non-surgical treatment efforts encompass the use of anti-inflammatory medications and/or steroid injections, which can ease the discomfort and immobility associated with conditions such as osteoarthritis.

In cases of joint deformity, such as finger bending causes by constricted hand tissues, splinting may be useful for providing stability and inhibiting damage advancement. Amongst all conditions, some type of behavior modification will likely be advantageous. In the case of hip or knee injury, common changes may include the use of crutches for walking or the avoidance of climbing stairs.

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3. In the case of joint replacement surgery, what diagnostic exams and tests will be completed pre-surgery?

As with the majority of orthopedic examinations, initial assessment efforts will likely include the manual testing of joint flexibility, dexterity, and strength. The patient will be led through a battery of activities, which allow functionality to be scaled for both immediate study and post-op comparison.

An x-ray or MRI will often be employed to fully document the location and severity of all damage, especially in the determination of whether total or partial joint replacement is required. Finally, before surgery, additional blood tests, and possibly an electrocardiogram, will likely be used to finalize all treatment components.

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4. What behavioral changes should be made before joint replacement surgery?

In order to avoid the progression of any injury, behavioral modifications will likely be prescribed prior to surgery. These efforts will allow for successful pre-op planning, as any additional damage between final tests and operation can be avoided.

Likewise, in the weeks before joint replacement, the patient may be advised to cease use of specific medications, especially those associated with the thinning of the blood. For successful pre-op efforts, a full medical history will be necessary, especially in regard to existing conditions and medication use.

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5. What types of planning should be completed for post-op recovery success?

Following joint replacement surgery, it is important to support successful healing, as well as to avoid potential re-injury. As part of an effective post-op strategy, the patient should plan for a gradual return to everyday activities, including standing and walking.

Specific timelines will be provided for the restarting of activities; however, regular medical consultations will be necessary to monitor the recovery progress and modify the expectations as needed. In addition, specific updates may be recommended for the at-home environment. These details may include the installation of a temporary access ramp and/or establishment of a first-floor living space.

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Learn More About Joint Replacement

Dr. Kastrup is experienced in the completion of both total hip and knee operations, as well as the range of other orthopedic treatment approaches. To schedule a consultation and exam, contact his Henderson office today.