Minimally Invasive Surgery (MIS)

MIS Joint Replacement offers important advantages, requiring smaller incisions and potentially causing less trauma, shorter hospital stay, faster recovery and less scarring than traditional techniques.

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Total Joint Replacement (TJR)

Total joint replacement is a surgical procedure in which certain parts of an arthritic or damaged joint are removed and replaced with an artificial joint, which is designed to move just like a healthy joint.

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Shape Match Custom Fit Knee

A Triathlon Custom Fit Knee® (GetAroundKnee) with ShapeMatch® Technology replacement allows Dr. Kastrup to perform your knee procedure with customized guides that are designed to provide a fit more closely matching your unique anatomy.

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Sports Medicine FAQ

Dr. Kastrup is a board-certified orthopedic surgeon renowned for his use of minimally invasive techniques in the treatment of both sports and non-athletic-related overuse injuries. Dr. Kastrup works one-on-one with patients to diagnosis the cause of joint pain, create a customized treatment plan, prevent future injuries, and help patients return to their favorite sports as soon as possible.

  1. How does an ACL tear occur, and what are the treatment options?
  2. What are meniscal tears in the knee, and how are they treated?
  3. What is runner’s knee, and how is it treated?
  4. What is arthroscopic knee surgery?
  5. What is bursitis of the hip, and how is it treated?
  6. How are rotator cuff tears treated?


1. How does an ACL tear occur, and what are the treatment options?

The ACL (anterior cruciate ligament) is a crucial component of the knee joint, providing stability during movement. Tearing of the ACL occurs when the ligament is stretched beyond its normal range of motion most often during quick changes in direction, sudden decrease in speed, or an awkward landing after a jump.

Classified as either partial or full tears, ligament tears initially cause pain, and swelling, and once the initial inflammation resolves, may lead to symptoms of instability (looseness and giving out). Ligaments, such as the ACL, naturally have a decreased blood flow so they are typically unable to heal on their own.

Patients with instability related to an ACL tear are at higher risk of injuring the other parts of the knee if the knee gives out again. Therefore, for active individuals and athletes, surgical reconstruction to restore the function of the ACL is recommended.

Patients who are not athletic or have no symptoms of looseness with an ACL tear, can be treated without surgery, usually with physical therapy and/or a brace.

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2. What are meniscal tears in the knee, and how are they treated?

The meniscus is a protective cartilage in the knee that acts like a gasket or bumper cushion between the two main bones of the knee. It provides support and stability to the knee joint during movement. Damage to the meniscus can result in severe pain, weakness, and instability.

Twisting of the knee or sudden decreases in speed often causes meniscal tears. In addition, meniscal tears often occur in conjunction with ACL (anterior cruciate ligament) tears.

In the event of a meniscal tear, Dr. Kastrup will often recommend a treatment routine initially including:

  • Rest
  • Application of a cold compress
  • Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory medications
After a period of rest, patients will begin incorporating strengthening exercises into their routine to increase joint stability and build up the muscles around the knee. For those patients who continue to have pain after this treatment, minimally invasive knee surgery to trim or repair the damaged cartilage may be recommended.

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3. What is runner’s knee, and how is it treated?

Runner’s knee, also known as patellofemoral pain, is a painful condition caused by damage to the kneecap, most frequently due to overuse or misalignment. Misalignment of the kneecap can increase pressure on the joint and cause the cartilage to wear away.

Symptoms include dull aching pain around the front of the kneecap (most noticeable when walking up and down stairs), kneeling, squatting, or going from a sitting to a standing position. Runner’s knee can also be the result of dislocation of the knee joint, injury, or infection.

Patients suffering from flat foot are at a higher risk of developing runner’s knee, as well as athletes who participate in activities that involve the frequent bending of the knees, such as biking, running, and basketball.

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4. What is arthroscopic knee surgery?

Arthroscopic knee surgery uses minimally invasive techniques and specialized instruments to repair the damaged areas of the joint. Patients suffering from ACL and meniscus tears will often benefit most from knee arthroscopy. The benefits of arthroscopic surgery include less scarring and decreased recovery time. Typically, patients are able to return to their daily activities 3 to 5 days post-op, though it is recommended that patients avoid strenuous activities for a few weeks.

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5. What is bursitis of the hip, and how is it treated?

The bursa is a fluid-filled space between the tendons, bones, and skin of the hip joint. Irritation to the bursa can result in a painful condition known as bursitis. Bursitis is the inflammation of the bursa due to repetitive use, sustained pressure, and limping.

Symptoms of bursitis (including aching pain in the hip that may radiate down to the knee, swelling around the affected joint, and joint stiffness) are usually relieved with rest, anti-inflammatory drugs, corticosteroid injections, physical therapy, and prescribed at-home exercises.

Very rarely are patients unable to relieve symptoms with conservative methods; however, if symptoms do continue, surgery to drain the inflamed bursa may be necessary.

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6. How are rotator cuff tears treated?

Treatment of rotator cuff tears will depend greatly on the severity of the tear, which is best determined through the use of MRI testing. For partial tears, Dr. Kastrup will often recommend a combination of strengthening exercises, anti-inflammatory medication, and corticosteroid injection which will frequently return normal functionality to the joint. If a rotator cuff tear is left untreated, it can grow in size and severity. Large tears will often require surgery to return joint strength and relieve pain.

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